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Did someone say the word: FREE?   Yes, free! There are 2 AVIs and 2 JPEGs for use as backgrounds either for personal or commercial use and it's all royalty-free as well. The 2 AVIs are DV AVI, 720 x 480, NTSC standard files, and if the need arises, you can convert them in your video editor to PAL or QuickTime, or 24p DV, or widescreen, or MOV, QT, RM, UIS, ASF, FLC, FLI, FLX, MPG, or WMV, if you have Ulead Media Studio Pro 7 or 8. If we had included these conversions on our DVDs so we could brag about formats we offer, the DVDs would have much fewer useable videos and photos for you to use, since any one editor needs one format for most jobs.

So we're offering the first 4 images (2 are AVIs, all are 720 x 480) at the right for absolutely free to acquaint you with the types of files found on our 2 DVDs.

One other great tool is Windows Media Encoder, which turns our AVIs into WMVs that take much less space on DVDs, CDs, or hard drives.
Bootyful AND Beautiful! This must be heaven! Read below the pictures for details about our BOOTYFUL exercise videos!

Bootyful AND Beautiful!
These are the words that come to mind as you view these pretty ladies doing exercises. There are 10 different exercise types and 5 different DVDs that feature NO nagging during exercise, NO telling you to diet or change or get rid of fat. These tapes see you as perfect just as you are, and there's even a separate motivational section where you can learn various self-esteem boosters in case all those oppressive dieting ads on TV have managed to convince you you're somehow unacceptable!

Check 'em out now!
Beautiful Walking Clips!
If you or someone you know walks like poetry in motion, or if you want to see such ladies, read below the pictures!

Poetry in Motion!
These are the words that come to mind as you view our site host lady walking. We are paying $$$ for hot booty dancing and walking clips. Ladies needn't be pretty, but it's fine if they are. All they need to be is poetry in motion when they dance or walk! If you are such a lady, come to our site, and if you know such a lady, send her here!

   Check us out now!

MANUAL FOR VIDEO BACKGROUNDS AND PHOTOS

How to Use Our Video Backgrounds and Photos

WHAT YOU GET

You get two DVDs FULL of background content—JPEGs and AVIs. That’s over 8 gigabytes. And you get these helpful instructions. For only $19.95, getting one DVD full of location backgrounds with no obligations or royalties is a great deal, compared to most of what's available on the web. But we decided to give you TWO full DVDs at that price, because we had some footage whose pans were a bit shaky or jerky, and we thought you'd want to have those too, since even though you won't want the jerky part of the pan, there are HUNDREDS OF FRAMES TO EXTRACT BACKGROUND PHOTOS FROM in those clips, so, along with the fact that you can extract photos to use from ANY of our clips, this gives you THOUSANDS of backgrounds to select from. If there's a better deal on the web, I don’t know about it! The DVDs are not sorted by panning irregularities. All files are sorted by file content, regardless of irregularities, to make stuff easier to find.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

    1. Using a Video Background

    1. Forward-Reverse-Forward-Reverse-etc.
    2. Resolutions
    3. AVI vs. Photo
    4. Editing Out Perceived Copyright Infringing Details
    5. Using a Background with/without Moving Elements in Front of It

    2. Tools You Will Need

    1. ImageForge Pro
    2. PagePlus 11
    3. A Green Screen
    4. Media Studio Pro (I have version 7) or Another Video Editor
    5. Ultra 2 or Another Keying Utility for Video Layering

    3. Examples of AVIs and Photos I Edited or Applied Filters To

    1. house 1 photos\PH-livingFromKitchen-tightLeft.JPG
    2. house 1 photos\PH-livingFromKitchenDoor-left.JPG
    3. house 1 photos\PH-fronthall-fromliving-rt.JPG
    4. house 2 photos\1-bedroom.JPG and 1-bedroom-r.jpg and1-bedroom-r-e.jpg and All Others Ending in –e.jpg
    5. house exterior\front door\frontdoor1.avi and frontdoor2.avi
    6. nature\trees\trees1.avi and trees1-from-trees1.avi-before-editing.jpg
    7. nature\trees\trees6.avi and trees7.avi
    8. house exterior\patio-porch\patio2.avi and patio3.avi
    9. house interior\bathroom\bathroom2.avi and bathroom3.avi
    10. house interior\dining room\diningroom1.avi and diningroom2.avi
    11. nature\road\road4.avi and road5.avi
    12. park\park11.avi and park12.avi

    4. License Agreement—please read!














    1. Using a Video Background

    1. Forward-Reverse-Forward-Reverse-etc.
    2. Import: house exterior\front\front3.avi into your video editor and put the clip on your timeline and cut a 2.18 (second.frame) segment off the front and copy it 3 times and put the 3 copies on the timeline touching the first. Select the 2nd and fourth segments and set them to run in reverse. This is a sloppy version of a video background with moving foliage. Do the same with a 1.04 second segment and the slop goes away. The slop was about the camera moving a pixel sideways just after 1.04, and you don’t want that in your background. The 2.18 example was to demonstrate how easy it is to miss a slight camera shift if you're not looking for it.

      Anyway, Forward-Reverse-Forward-Reverse-etc. is the way you create a looping background segment that can go on forever even if you have as little as a second of footage to work with. The IDEAL background is a very long clip 10 minutes long that will satisfy any clip need without the need for looping. But in the real world, you'll be more likely settling for a few seconds you'll copy and reverse so it loops. The liability of shorter loops is a viewer detecting an unnatural pattern. The biggest liability of a longer one besides an anomaly going unnoticed, is that every 5 minutes of DV needs a gigabyte of storage space.

      But shots in Hollywood tend to average 6 seconds each between cuts. This shot shortness gives the illusion of action, even if often it’s only the cameras doing the action. Short cuts are not enough time for background video loop pattern detection by viewers.

    3. Resolutions
    4. In the AVIs, you'll find only the 720 x 480 you expect. If you need something different, your video editor can easily convert the clips to a different resolution. All the AVIs are standard DV compression (5/1).

      The photos are mostly either 640 x 480, shot with a digital still camera, and 720 x 480, shot with a standard DV video camera as action clips from which I extracted stills as JPEGs. Of course, if you don’t mind the extracted photos taking 1,036,854 bytes each, you may extract as many as you want yourself, as BMPs, but if you're that fussy about quality, you could still save disk space by using 100% quality JPEGs (around 222,000 bytes depending on the photo) or 80 – 90% quality (60,000 bytes) JPEGs, which in many cases are indistinguishable from 100% quality JPEGs or even some BMPs.

      From the context of a subject vs. its background, the object in front of the background—usually a person—should dominate so that in many cases any of these 3 photo qualities will suffice, as only very close inspection can show you which is better anyway. If you need the background alone, as an ES (establishing shot) clip, using AVIs of good DV quality or better quality photos is more important since the background is the center of attention.

    5. AVI vs. Photo
    6. If it’s supposed to be a very still day, or if it doesn’t matter whether it’s still or not, a photo background will do fine, especially if supplemented with convincing ambient sounds. If water is involved, even on a still day there are slight disturbances of the water’s surface so in most cases you need a long background video with no loops, since water ripples don’t go back and forth. Check out the "pond" subfolder in the "nature" folder and you'll see what I mean by the "still isn't really still" idea. It’s possible to repeat a waves clip over and over but reversing loops are not viable. You can do water loops with reversing only if you can't detect actual rippling.

      To extract a photo from our footage, scrub to the frame that suits your purpose, then in the Preview Window you can Save Image To . . . Image File. (Your editor may have different menu item names.) If you encounter pans or zooms, you can still get a good photo extract UNLESS THE ZOOM OR PAN IS MEDIUM TO FAST SPEED. There's too much blurring at faster speeds. If you need this blurring for special effects, however, then save it anyway (e.g., nature\trees\trees5.avi).

      The clip house exterior\front\front1.avi is a zoom; most of our zooms are clips from which all photo extracts will be clear. The clip house exterior\patio-porch\patio1.avi is a subjective camera POV shot one could use for a lurker or monster approaching a door (don’t forget the growls and breathing!). The clip nature\path in woods\pathinwoods6.avi is an outdoor subjective POV. The clip house exterior\side\side6.avi is cool because all its motion is in the shadows, except for a little hanging object way in the background.). The clip house exterior\side\side5.avi is saying "lots of wind here."). The last part of the clip house exterior\side\side4.avi is full of very energetic flying bugs.).

      The clip house exterior\side\side2.avi is perfect for making a video "loop"—see 1. a. Forward-Reverse-Forward-Reverse-etc., above. The clip house exterior\yard\yard11.avi is a slow downward pan on a tall tree next to a house. There are a few sideways pans that are a bit jerky (as stated in WHAT YOU GET, above), and the easiest way to use such clips is for photo extraction, or find a several-second pan between jerks. If you feel patient and are dying for that particular pan, you can take the jerky clip and isolate into short sub-clips the slowdown followed by the speedup inherent in a jerk. Jerkiness is often due to a cheap tripod and/or unsteady hand, but once these anomalies are isolated as sub-clips, a speed change can easily be edited in to clean up the pan. I can't imagine an editor without a clip speed editing option.

      There are several nice crows shots like park\park21.avi in the park folder. The clip nature\pond\pond1.avi is great for making pond "loops"—our cameraperson stopped several places in the pan so you could pull out a few-second clip. You cannot actually see ripples per se, so you can do forward-reverse loops. Thee clip has ripples so subtle that it makes the tree reflections in the water look like they're sparkling—quite a magical effect!

      If you ever wondered what happens if you convert an MPEG into an AVI, wonder no more: park\park17.avi. (Don’t try this at home, as the saying goes. Or anywhere else, for that matter!) The clip park\park5.avi is a "nature" study of an attractive lady—the cameraman couldn’t resist (can you blame him?), but you needn't worry about permission since you only need that if the image has a recognizable face. If a face is very small, like in a few of our park AVIs, this again would need no permission, as recognizability is the key. If a pan is slower than you need, like nature\woods\woods3.avi, then use your editor’s speed function and try it at 200%-400%.

    7. Editing Out Perceived Copyright Infringing Details
    8. If you ever create any type of photos or videos to sell, but don’t know the law (e.g., the face recognition factor above), get an expert entertainment attorney who knows all about copyright infringement to tell you all the ways you can end up with a restraining order on your creations and $25,000 to $150,000 fines per incident. Feel free to tremble in fear at this time. You cannot have anything in the shot that anyone has any rights to unless you get a release from the rights owner. You have to worry about all pictures on walls, sculptures, art objects, company names or logos, people’s faces or names, real phone numbers, impersonations used in an advertising context, locations where you shoot, etc. NOTE: SEE 4. C. of our LICENSE AGREEMENT, at the end of this document.

      Once you find potentially infringing items, you need to get permission from ALL of the items’ rights holders or erase the items from your photo backgrounds or video backgrounds. For the former, PhotoShop or ImageForge Pro are good, and for the latter, Video Paint—part of Ulead’s Media Studio Pro—will do. See below for how to use it. And for an example of a clip that was edited this way by Video Paint, see 3. f. nature\trees\trees1.avi and trees1-from-trees1.avi-before-editing.jpg, below. For a photo example edited by ImageForge Pro, see 3. a. house 1 photos\PH-livingFromKitchen-tightLeft.JPG.

    9. Using a Background with/without Moving Elements in Front of It

    For Moving Elements In Front or for Moving Background but Non-Moving Elements In Front: If you video someone in front of a green screen and then try to use non-keying video editors for the keying job, the results will rarely be presentable. Video Editor is the best video editor I know of but it sucks as a keyer. Ultra 2 is a great keying application, however. If you want to see what's ginormously crappy about keying in a video editor not meant to key, load a background into the Va track in Video Editor (or a similar editor), and load a video of a person in front of a green screen into track V1. Select this clip and right-click and choose Overlay Options. Move on the left thumbnail and click the eye-dropper on the green that’s half way between the brightest and darkest green of your green screen. Make sure Type is set to Color Key and Mask is set to Overlay Clip and click OK. Move the Similarity slider right until there's no green but also no disappearing parts of the person—probably around 18%. Check out the Preview Window at Full Size. Green in the hair and elsewhere, and he's got a chunk of his nose missing and a hole in his back. Fine-tune Similarity all you want, but unless you shot a PERFECTLY lit green screen with a perfectly lit person in front of it, the result is not worth spit, unless your purpose was merely to create videos or pictures of thumbnail size, like 100 x 100.

    The moral of the story is: use Ultra 2 or some other fine keying application if your subject cannot be shot in front of the desired background and you use green screen shots.

    For Non-Moving Elements In Front of a Still Background: If neither the subject nor the background move, you can still use Ultra 2, but if you have no keyer you could also use the above Video Editor keying example on your green screen shots and get the best result you can and then in the Preview Window you can Save Image To . . . Image File, and then use PhotoShop or ImageForge or a similar graphics utility to clean up the crudely keyed result. This cleaned-up composite could then be loaded into the Va track of Video Editor as the sole video component of the clip you're working on, with no overlay needed.

    For a Background with Nothing in Front of It: If you just want the viewers to see your background and it’s a simple ES (establishing shot), you might want to leave it there 3 or 4 seconds, possibly with a slight, slow zoom.

    In the last decade, we’re seeing more in-your-face, sensationalistic, special effects using ESs that use whooshes or booms or bangs accompanied with sudden, shock-you-awake zooms and pans, and sometimes this stuff makes one queasy or it feels oppressive—especially when news programs do it to look cool and stylish. This is a good example of the medium getting in the way of the message, because this, and constantly seeing words like News Alert on the screen when the news item isn't even newsworthy, together tend to create jaded and cynical audiences who are skeptical and have simply heard the media cry wolf once too often, and the whole thing backfires and audiences tend not to listen to or believe their TVs anymore—polls tell us they tune out and do something else, like surf the web, do text messaging, read a blog, write an email, or converse.

    Anyway, the best policy is to always do zoom and pan shots with the camera and not the video editor, but if this isn't doable, it’s simple to do with an editor. Of course to create a pan shot from a still requires zooming as well or you'll go off the "edge of the world." Try to use a clip with foliage moving at least slightly so the background feels alive. If you're in a house, try to show a window with moving foliage outside. If nothing moves, you may as well use a photo.

    2. Tools You Will Need

    1. ImageForge Pro
    2. ImageForge Pro is only $28.95 (2006) and does most of what the expensive graphics creation/editing applications do, including animation sequences, batch file conversions, filters, web tools and web art creation, photo retouching, save to PDF, color separations, regional effects, 3D text, color similarity fills, masks, layers, etc. Or you could use the more complex app, PhotoShop.

    3. PagePlus 11
    4. This will make much better text titles than ImageForge. PagePlus has good beveling, shadowing, and a 3D feature that’s hard to beat. If you need to make brochure PDFs and cards and flyers and posters or even booklets to advertise your videos, this is the app. It has 3D lighting, web publishing, master pages, and a ton of other features as well.

    5. A Green Screen
    6. Go to chroma-key.com to find the green screen size you need. They have stands and good prices. Keep it smooth and well lit. Just before use, while it’s hanging, use a steam iron to smooth it if there are wrinkles.

      For lighting, light the screen and subject totally separately. Don’t have subject lighting spill onto the green screen. And don’t let shadows from the subject get onto the screen. Light the subject from lights off to the side that hit the subject at least at a 45-degree angle. Use a light meter to help even out lighter and darker areas of the green screen if you can. Both subject and screen should be well lit, but not overly lit. Lights from above and below or from the 2 sides, or both, should light the green screen. Remember that the lights will be closer to the screen edges and therefore tend to make them brighter, but when you point lights more toward the middle, you may end up with an overlit center because both left and right lights’ light beams overlap there.

    7. Media Studio Pro (I have version 7) or Another Video Editor; here are the apps Media Studio Pro contains:
    8. Video Editor

      This Ulead editor is fast, easy to learn, and extremely capable for editing DV, HDV, or MPEG clips into great movies. Put clips or images on the timeline, apply filters and special effects and transitions, add titles, save and render.

      Movie Factory 4.0 or Higher

      This Ulead app will make DVD creation a snap. Reduce size to fit a DVD is an icon you must remember to click on the Burn screen if your clips add up to over 4.37 gigabytes. And use 4x speed to get less screw-ups. And don’t use normalize audio, in the Burn options. You can have motion menus, submenus, and background images and music of your own choosing on your DVDs.

      Video Paint

      This Ulead app will let you edit your DV footage to remove unwanted objects, video defects, etc. See 3. f. nature\trees\trees1.avi and trees1-from-trees1.avi-before-editing.jpg.

      CG Infinity

      You can create vector-based graphics and text using path, shape and freehand tools with this Ulead app. Object, moving path and key-frame attributes provide professional control. Tight integration with Video Editor saves time and effort. You'll have text or objects such as spheres spinning all over the place in your movies.

    9. Ultra 2 or Another Keying Utility for Video Layering
    10. What Happens If You Use Your Video Editor’s Keyer

      See the first two paragraphs of 1. e. Using a Background with/without Moving Elements in Front of It

      What Happens If You Use Ultra 2

      This is how one takes one’s green screen-backgrounded videos and inserts a background, still or moving, TO REPLACE ALL GREEN SCREEN PIXELS. Using this app is a whole different ballgame than a video editor, since it’s built for keying and it does a great job! And at a great price, compared to the competition. Serious Magic’s Vector Keying™ technology blows away the primitive keyer built into your video editing app. Now shots that used to be impossible to key—uneven lighting, wrinkled backgrounds and frizzy hair—can be finished being edited in minutes. You can change the size and orientation of the subject and/or the background as well as make a zoom or pan. The results you get look just like the background and subject were shot together to begin with.

     

    3. Examples of AVIs and Photos I Edited or Applied Filters To

    1. house 1 photos\PH-livingFromKitchen-tightLeft.JPG
    2. This photo had a large hanging picture on the wall that I used ImageForge to paint out. First I used the eye dropper. I copied the color near the picture and with the scissors tool, I (control-X) erased the hanging picture and then filled the area with the eye dropper-selected color. But there's a dark-to-light gradation in this area so I had to use a large paintbrush tip and the eye dropper to slowly create that gradation, crudely done. Often setting edge and intensity to their sliders’ mid-positions was needed for the subtleties required. Now the darken, lighten, splatter and smudge features of the retouching tool, along with the Update Drawing Area icon in the upper left corner, were used with a variety of brush tips and brush sizes, and with lower and lower intensity slider settings in order to get the wall looking like there had never been a picture there. Pictures are best taken down before a shoot. If you forget, retouch them out of the photo. The main thing is to never face a huge infringement fine!

    3. house 1 photos\PH-livingFromKitchenDoor-left.JPG
    4. Same editing as a., above. I painted out that picture again.

    5. house 1 photos\PH-fronthall-fromliving-rt.JPG
    6. This one was complicated. There was a copyrighted big wooden duck art sculpture on the floor and I had to not only paint it out but fabricate a table leg and a tile grid pattern on the floor, by using the scissors tool to (control-C) copy tiny areas near those that were blocked by the duck and use these on top of the duck pixels. It took a couple of hours to vanish the duck and fabricate sections of wall, molding, floor, and leg and then fine-tune the results. It was fun!

    7. house 2 photos\1-bedroom.JPG and 1-bedroom-r.jpg and1-bedroom-r-e.jpg and All Others Ending in –e.jpg
    8. The r means rotated, since the originals were taken with the camera rotated on its side. The e means enlarged to 720 wide, so it could be used behind 720-wide subject video. The result is a bit subtle and hazy and is good for extra emphasis on the subject and less emphasis on the background. Like when you have the subject in focus in front of an out-of-focus background—another way to de-emphasize backgrounds.

    9. house exterior\front door\frontdoor1.avi and frontdoor2.avi
    10. The Brightness & Contrast Video Filter was used on frontdoor1 to make frontdoor2, a lighter version of the same thing.

    11. nature\trees\trees1.avi and trees1-from-trees1.avi-before-editing.jpg
    12. The trees1.avi clip has a wonderful tree with a red purse on a limb, which is shown in the photo trees1-from-trees1.avi-before-editing.jpg. The purse was edited out using Video Paint, which comes with Media Studio Pro 7. I loaded the AVI into Video Paint, then looked through the frames and found the frames with problems—in this case, all of them. I then used the paintbrushes and retouch tool to paint out the purse. I also had to select tiny areas and drag the areas on top of the purse pixels. Once I had the first frame fixed, I proceeded to use this app’s tools to efficiently fix the rest of the frames. Here are your instructions for accomplishing this feat with your own clips:

      Once the frame is good, if nothing in the clip moves, including the camera, you can simply copy that frame onto the other frames in the sequence, like so: Check to see that the shape selection tool is still selected and, assuming your fixed frame is in the window, press control-A to select all and then click inside the frame once. There should be a moving dashed line around the frame. Make sure the Layer Mode (found on the Edit pull-down menu) is Composite. Now use Power Duplicate on the Edit menu and make sure it says the Source is Selection and you'll apply after the current frame. Now enter your Duration (the number of seconds and frames from your current position) and press OK. You'll be asked if you want to "clear the undo history." You do. Now from the Edit menu, go to Select and select None All Frames. You'll be asked if you want to clear the undo history again. You do, again. The work is done, so save it as a Video Paint project with Save and as an AVI like so: From the File menu select Create Video File and you'll see it try to default to an uncompressed DV. Select DV compression from the template and save the file.

      If the clip you want to edit has motion, unlike my trees AVI, then Click the shape selection tool and drag a box around your edited work—the part you want to copy to the rest of those frames. Click in your box. If it moves your edited stuff, move it back to where it belongs. Make sure the Layer Mode (found on the Edit pull-down menu) is Paint Layer. Now use Power Duplicate on the Edit menu and make sure it says the Source is Paint Layer and you'll apply after the current frame. Now enter your Duration (the number of seconds and frames from your current position) and press OK. You'll be asked if you want to clear the undo history. You do. Now from the Edit menu, go to Select and select None all frames. You'll be asked if you want to clear the undo history. You do, again. The work is done, so save it as a Video Paint project and as an AVI. From the File menu select Create Video File and you'll see it try to default to an uncompressed DV. Select DV compression from the template and save the file.

      If you have a duplicated area (e.g., where you just did some editing with a paintbrush) you want to move across the video screen (perhaps because the camera is slow panning and you want your duplication region to follow this pan), once you select Power Duplicate you'll have to change the X and Y offset at the bottom of the dialog. Lots of luck guessing the correct number of pixels. But even though you may need a few test runs, once you get it right, just think of the work you’ve saved! The alternative is editing a frame at a time!

      One word of caution. In a moving duplication area scenario, if the area around your edit area is one simple color, editing out a hanging picture by putting a box of that color over it will be simple to power duplicate and even if your X and Y guesses are off, you'll likely get a good result with a couple of tries. But if there are texture, objects, and/or irregularities that one or more borders of your box transects, then you'll have to get the X and Y just right or the final product will reveal the editing. And if the pan went sideways but then a bit upwards as well, you'll end up having to break down the power duplications into shorter durations each of which describes a straight line path. This can be very tricky, and in order to dump that hanging picture, you may have to cheat and change the wall it hangs on into a nontextured, simple color—the one closest to the wall’s average color in this area. Or reshoot the clip, sans picture.

    13. nature\trees\trees6.avi and trees7.avi
    14. I used the Color Balance video filter here.

    15. house exterior\patio-porch\patio2.avi and patio3.avi
    16. I used the Color Balance and Brightness & Contrast video filters here.

    17. house interior\bathroom\bathroom2.avi and bathroom3.avi
    18. I removed a picture from the wall in both these clips, using Video Paint as described above. Since the clip didn’t show motion, I got away with duplicating a textured area. In actual fact, the camera moved just enough to reveal the edited section’s slight motion relative to the background, but it’s barely noticeable. Feel free to "tame" this bad boy in your Video Paint or its equivalent.

    19. house interior\dining room\diningroom1.avi and diningroom2.avi
    20. I used the Brightness & Contrast video filter here.

    21. nature\road\road4.avi and road5.avi
    22. I used the Color Balance and Brightness & Contrast video filters here.

    23. park\park11.avi and park12.avi
    24. I used the Color Balance and Brightness & Contrast video filters here.

     

4. LICENSE AGREEMENT

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This License Agreement does not constitute a sale. All title, trade secrets, copyrights, patents and other intellectual rights to the Media Recordings Product, its accompanying documentation and any copy made by Licensee remain with PIN, and Licensee hereby agrees to preserve and acknowledges the foregoing. Licensee further agrees and acknowledges that the Media Recordings Product and all copies thereof are PIN's exclusive property and constitute a valuable trade secret of PIN. Licensee further agrees and acknowledges that unauthorized copying of the Media Recordings Product or the accompanying documentation, or failure to comply with any of the provisions hereof (each, a "Terminable Event"), will result in automatic termination of this License. In the event of a violation of this License by Licensee, PIN reserves and shall have available all legal remedies.

E. LIMITED WARRANTY AND DISCLAIMER

PIN warrants that, for a period of ninety (90) days after delivery, the DVDs on which the Media Recordings are furnished will, under normal use, be free from defects that prevent Licensee from loading the Media Recordings Product on a computer. PIN's entire liability and Licensee's exclusive remedy under this warranty will be to have PIN replace the Media Recordings Product with functionally equivalent Media Recordings. This Limited Warranty is void if failure of the Media Recordings Product or hardware has resulted from accident, abuse, or misapplication. Any replacement Media Recordings Product will be warranted for the remainder of the original warranty period or thirty (30) days, whichever is longer. Such remedies are available only with proof of purchase from an authorized source. The Media Recordings Product is licensed to you on an "as is" basis without any warranty of any nature.

F. NO OTHER WARRANTIES

EXCEPT FOR THE ABOVE EXPRESS LIMITED WARRANTIES, PIN AND ITS SUPPLIERS MAKE AND LICENSEE RECEIVES NO WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS, OR TERMS, EXPRESS, IMPLIED, STATUTORY, OR IN ANY COMMUNICATION WITH LICENSEE. TO THE MAXIMUM EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW, PIN AND ITS SUPPLIERS DISCLAIM ALL OTHER WARRANTIES AND CONDITIONS, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, TITLE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT, WITH REGARD TO THE MEDIA RECORDINGS PRODUCT AND THE PROVISION OF OR FAILURE TO PROVIDE SUPPORT SERVICES. LICENSEE SHALL BE SOLELY RESPONSIBLE FOR THE SELECTION, USE, EFFICIENCY AND SUITABILITY OF THE MEDIA RECORDINGS PRODUCT AND PIN SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY THEREFOR. PIN SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY FOR, NOR OBLIGATION TO INDEMNIFY LICENSEE REGARDING ACTIONS ALLEGING THE INFRINGEMENT OF PROPRIETARY RIGHTS BY THE MEDIA RECORDINGS PRODUCT. PIN DOES NOT WARRANT THAT THE OPERATION OF THE MEDIA RECORDINGS PRODUCT WILL BE UNINTERRUPTED OR ERROR FREE OR THAT THE MEDIA RECORDINGS PRODUCT WILL MEET LICENSEE'S SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS.

G. LIMITATION OF LIABILITY

IN NO EVENT WILL PIN OR ITS SUPPLIERS BE LIABLE FOR LOSS OF DATA, CORRUPTION, LOST PROFITS, COST OF COVER, OR OTHER SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE, CONSEQUENTIAL, OR INDIRECT DAMAGES ARISING FROM THE USE OF THE MEDIA RECORDINGS PRODUCT (INCLUDING ANY ACCOMPANYING DOCUMENTATION), HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY. THIS LIMITATION WILL APPLY EVEN IF PIN OR AN AUTHORIZED DISTRIBUTOR HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE. IN NO EVENT WILL PIN'S LIABILITY EXCEED THE AMOUNT PAID FOR THE MEDIA RECORDINGS PRODUCT. LICENSEE ACKNOWLEDGES THAT THE AMOUNTS PAID BY LICENSEE FOR THE MEDIA RECORDINGS PRODUCT REFLECT THIS ALLOCATION OF RISK.

H. NO RENTAL; OTHER TRANSFERS

You may transfer this License to another computer or workstation only on a permanent basis (that is, with no intent to transfer again) provided the computer, workstation, or other digital electronic device from which you have transferred this License no longer accesses or otherwise utilizes the Media Recordings Product, and the Media Recordings Product is used in accordance with the terms of this License Agreement.

I. TERMINATION

You may terminate this License Agreement at any time by ceasing to use the product or by selling it to someone and destroying your backups of the product. PIN may terminate this License Agreement if you fail to comply with the terms and conditions of this License Agreement. In either event, you must destroy all copies of the Media Recordings Product.

J. GUIDELINES FOR THE USE OF DIGITAL CONTENT IMAGES

This product contain numerous video and photo images (collectively referred to as the "Videos and Images") which are either owned by PIN or licensed from a third-party. As a user of this product you are free to use, modify and publish the Videos and Images as you wish subject to the restrictions set out below. If you are uncertain as to whether your intended use is in compliance with the Guidelines set out below, we recommend that you seek the advice of your own attorney or legal counsel.

1. YOU MAY, subject to any restrictions set out below:

a. incorporate any Videos and Image(s) into your own original work and publish, display and distribute your work in any media. You may not, however, resell, sublicense or otherwise make available the Videos and Image(s) for use or distribution separately or detached from a product or web page. For example, the Videos and Image(s) may be used as part of a web page design, but may not be made available for downloading separately or in a format designed or intended for permanent storage or re-use by others. Similarly, clients may be provided with copies of the Videos and Image(s) (including digital files) as an integral part of a work product, but may not be provided with the Videos and Image(s) or permitted to use the Videos and Image(s) separately or as part of any other product.

b. make one (1) copy of the Videos and Image(s) for backup or archival purposes.

2. YOU MAY NOT

a. create scandalous, obscene, pornographic, hate-speech, illegal, treasonable, defamatory or immoral works using the Videos and Image(s) nor use the Videos and Image(s) for any other purpose which is prohibited by law;

b. use or permit the use of the Videos and Image(s) or any part thereof as a trademark or service mark, or claim any proprietary rights of any sort in the Videos and Image(s) or any part thereof;

c. use the Videos and Image(s) in electronic format, on-line or in multimedia applications unless the following is met: (a) The Videos and Image(s) are incorporated for viewing purposes only and no permission is given to download and/or save the Videos and Image(s) for any reason.

d. rent, lease, sublicense or lend the Videos and Image(s), or a copy thereof, to another person or legal entity. You may, however, transfer all your license to use the Videos and Image(s) to another person or legal entity, provided that (i) you transfer the Videos and Image(s) and this License, including all copies (except copies incorporated into your work product as permitted under this License), to such person or entity, (ii) that you retain no copies, including copies stored on a computer or other storage device, and (iii) the receiving party agrees to be bound by the terms and conditions of this License;

e. use any Videos and Image(s) except as expressly permitted by this License.

K. MISCELLANEOUS

This Agreement shall not be governed by the 1980 U. N. Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods; rather, this Agreement shall be governed by United States law. This Agreement constitutes the entire agreement between PIN and Licensee and supersedes all prior agreements, understandings, communications, advertising, proposals or representations, oral or written, by either party. If any provision of this Agreement is held invalid or unenforceable, such provision shall be revised to the extent necessary to cure the invalidity or non-enforceability, and the remainder of this Agreement shall continue in full force and effect. This Agreement shall be amended only by an executed writing by authorized representatives of both parties.

 


Please steal this video!
(You  know  you want to.)